As a non-glasses wearer, I wouldn't have thought to look in an opticians for normal sunglasses. However I stumbled on a selection from Optical ExpressWhen you start dropping brand names such as Givenchy and Tom Ford in the equation, my eyes light up. Let's face it though, if I buy an expensive pair of sunglasses, I will break them. A girl can lust...




1) Take me to St.Tropez... These gold Givenchy shades (£175) conjure up images of rubbish shoulders with the rich and famous. 

2) Another gorgeous pair by Givenchy (I didn't realise they did such gorgeous sunglasses!), this time in black with subtle leopard detailing (£159). I'd pair these with an all-black ensemble 

3) The third and final pair that I fell head over heels for are the Jimmy Choo Juliets. Coming in at a mighty £230, these are a real investment as they are in such a classic style. Don a red lip as you navigate the streets of Milian in these stylish shades.

All this talk of opticians really got me thinking. With both of my parents glasses wearers, it's the case of when rather than if I'll be joining the club. At the ripe old age of 22, I think I've come off quite lucky; a lot of my friends started wearing glasses in primary school. Yet if I'm so predisposed to having problems with my eyes, why did it take me until now to have my eyes tested? 

If you're like me, a fully fledged adult (although that doesn't feel the case) yet to have your eyes tested, here's a bit of a walk through my first eye test experience.  Before we start, I'd like to say that I had mine at a university ophthalmology department, so the experience may be slightly different if you were going to a traditional opticians. 

Before my first eye test, I was really quite nervous. As I previously mentioned, poor eyesight runs in the family, and my grandad sufferered from glaucoma. Although I hadn't experienced any problems, the inner hypochondriac in me was having a panic and a half. 

I had a lovely female student examining my eyes, and she instantly made me feel at ease. We started off with the classic letter/number chart, and then moved on to a few more complex exercises and imaging techniques. As the results of most of these were self-reported (I had to say the word/letter I saw, for example), I was a bit worried that I would say the wrong thing; I tend to get my words a bit muddled when I get flustered. However I needn't have worried as the results came in and she said my eyesight was perfect. She even complimented me about my iris colour (see me getting technical now). It's the kind of thing like that that really made me feel so at ease. 

After my positive first experience getting an eye test, I'll be much more comfortable when it comes to booking my next one. I know how important it is to get your eyes checked regularly (once every two years is the recommendation) as it can help detect early warning signs for glaucoma and cataracts. Interestingly, an eye test can also highlight general health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure. You can read more on the Optical Express website

I went off on a bit of a tangent with this post, but if you've cast your eye over my postings this week, you'll see that I'm no stranger to a good old ramble. I'd love to hear your opinions. Are you a fan of the more rambly, chatty posts? Or do you prefer a more to-the-point approach? 


- Disclaimer: This post has been written in sponsored collaboration with Optical Express -